Accommodating disabilities

Reasonable accommodation is available to qualified applicants and employees with disabilities. Reasonable accommodations must be provided to qualified employees regardless of whether they work part- time or full-time, or are considered "probationary." Generally, the individual with a disability must inform the employer that an accommodation is needed. For a further discussion of this issue, see Question 31, infra. "[W]ith or without reasonable accommodation" includes, if necessary, reassignment to a vacant position.

Although many individuals with disabilities can apply for and perform jobs without any reasonable accommodations, there are workplace barriers that keep others from performing jobs which they could do with some form of accommodation. This Guidance sets forth an employer's legal obligations regarding reasonable accommodation; however, employers may provide more than the law requires. This Guidance examines what "reasonable accommodation" means and who is entitled to receive it. The employee requests a stool because sitting greatly reduces the fatigue. This accommodation is reasonable because it is a common-sense solution to remove a workplace barrier being required to stand when the job can be effectively performed sitting down.

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